SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS

All of our frames are eco-friendly. Wood is biodegradable, and it’s a natural resource.  Learn more about the types of wood used to make our frames and the health benefits you with enjoy while being fashionable.

Brazil Rosewood

Benefits: Its aroma in the environment decreases the changes of humor by menopause, premenstrual syndrome and depression. Eliminates feelings of frustration and anxiety. Raised self-esteem, calms and gives confidence.

What is rose wood used for? Rosewood is also used in the construction of luxury furniture, paneling, veneer and various small objects. The slow growth and small size of Dalbergia genus trees results in the available lumber being rather small and often prohibitively expensive.

Cassia Siamea Lam

Also known as Siamese cassia, kassod tree, cassod tree, and Cassia tree. Senna siamea or most commonly known as Siamese Senna is native to South and Southeast Asia.

The leaves are used as green manure. All plant parts can be used for tanning. The wood is used for joinery, cabinet making, inlaying, handles, sticks, and other decorative uses. In addition, it can be made into charcoal of excellent quality.

Ebony Wood

Ebony is a dense black hardwood, most commonly yielded by several different species in the genus Diospyros, which also contains the persimmons. Ebony is dense enough to sink in water. It is finely-textured and has a very smooth finish when polished, making it valuable as an ornamental wood. The word ebony comes from the Ancient Egyptianhbny, through the Ancient Greek into Latin and Middle English

Silver Oak

Grivillea Robusta

The wood is strong, light in weight, durable but porous.  The wood from Grevillea robusta is used in parts of the world for fuel as it makes good charcoal and firewood, as well as being used to make furniture. It is thought that the gum which exudes from the tree when it is cut could be used for industrial purposes. Yellow and green dyes can be made from the leaves, and the flowers are used for their fragrance.

Black Oak

Renewable Wood Resource Oak wood is prized for its hardness, density and durability, and carpenters use its lumber for building beams, furniture and cabinetry. All trees are renewable, since more seedlings can be planted to replace the old fallen tree. These will mature for future generations to harvest and use for construction.

Persimmons

Persimmon is the only American ebony and also one of the few woods with a sapwood that is used commercially along with its heartwood. The persimmon tree is generally small to medium in size, which limits its uses. And while it is one of the strongest hardwoods available, suitable for use as a supporting beam, for example, it doesn't grow in dimensions suitable for that use.

Sandalwood

Ebony is a dense black hardwood, most commonly yielded by several different species in the genus Diospyros, which also contains the persimmons. Ebony is dense enough to sink in water. It is finely-textured and has a very smooth finish when polished, making it valuable as an ornamental wood. The word ebony comes from the Ancient Egyptianhbny, through the Ancient Greek into Latin and Middle English.

 

Teak Wood

 The reason is that teak is valuable both for its elegance and its durability. Beyond its beauty, it also possesses some natural properties that other woods don't have.

Teak has always been a prized material. The tree that teak comes from, Tectona grandis, is native to the tropics. 

Zebra Wood

The alternating light and dark stripes of zebrawood makes its name seem quite appropriate. Although there are numerous trees that can produce products marketed as zebrawood, the authentic products are generally recognized as those that come from trees in the Microberlinia family. These are found near riverbanks in the African countries of Gabon and Cameroon. This wood may also be called Zebrano, African zebrawood, and Zingana.